Cullen Gillaspia Jersey

Cullen Gillaspia is a running back out of Texas A&M and has a tough road ahead of him to find his spot on the roster of the Texans, though he does have talent in various aspects of the game to make his mark this offseason.

Gillaspia was the Texans’ seventh round pick and he joins a running back roster that is looking for a solid third option behind Lamar Miller and D’Onta Foreman, who are the top two running backs currently on the roster.

Also the Texans passed on running back Kerrith Whyte, Jr. with this pick, who also has very nice speed. He was drafted two picks later by the Chicago Bears, and is a player who could produce in the special teams with his Pro Day 40-yard dash time of 4.37, meaning Gillaspia might become compared to Whyte Jr. this offseason by fans of the Texans.

One way Gillaspia could make the roster besides playing on offense for the Texans is to be used on special teams, and Lance Zierlein of NFL.com wrote this of Gillaspia in his draft profile of the running back:

“His fearless playing style and soft hands are both positive traits in his conversion from linebacker to fullback, but he may be too far away from a true positional fit to make a team as a special teams demon.”

Though Gillaspia didn’t return any punts or kickoffs in 2018, he did have three kickoff returns in ’17, though he averaged only nine years per return. That said, he still possesses the speed to work his way to being a positive for the special teams, which the Texans could use. At his Pro Day, Gillaspia had a 40-yard time of 4.57.

This was an interesting pick to say the least as my thoughts were the Texans would have selected a running back a little earlier in the draft, but now it looks as though Miller and Foreman are the top choices for the Texans at running back up to this point of the offseason.

Xavier Crawford Jersey

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Xavier Crawford is headed to Houston.

With the No. 195 overall pick in the 2019 NFL Draft, Crawford was selected by the Houston Texans.

Now that the cornerback has been picked in the sixth round, the cornerback is expected to join post-draft rookie minicamp with the Texans in early May.

Crawford is the second player from Central Michigan to be selected in the draft, as fellow cornerback Sean Bunting went No. 39 overall to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers on April 27.

While Bunting stuck with CMU throughout his college years, Crawford’s route was a bit different as a graduate transfer from Oregon State for the 2018 season. He came to the Chippewas after finishing his undergraduate degree in three years.

Both Bunting and Crawford gave up their final year of eligibility to enter the draft, and the pair were on the First Team All-Mid-American Conference defensive group for their performances last campaign.

Crawford took a redshirt in his first year at Oregon State and immediately found the field in 2016 as a redshirt freshman. He logged 70 tackles, two tackles for a loss, one sack, 10 passes defended and one forced fumble.

In 2017, he registered 17 tackles and two passes defended in five games before going down with a season-ending back injury. Then, Crawford made the move to Mount Pleasant.

The 5-foot-11, 187-pound defensive back posted 24 tackles, three tackles for a loss, one interception, 12 passes defended and two fumble recoveries for the Chippewas. Crawford ranked No. 1 in the MAC for his 12 passes defended.

While Bunting and Crawford have found their future through the draft, a few other Chippewas are expected to be picked up as undrafted free agents. Those players should begin to emerge on Saturday evening after the final round is complete.

Charles Omenihu Jersey

The 2019 NFL Draft is now just one day away, and the Texas football program should be very excited about the possibility of having a first or second round pick coming off the Forty Acres. This is an interesting event for fans of the Longhorns to follow along with. Former Texas defensive end Charles Omenihu is possibly the most prominent draft prospect coming off the Forty Acres too.

All in all, the Texas Longhorns football program should be sending around four or five players into the actual seven rounds of the 2019 NFL Draft. There will be a host of undrafted free agents that the Longhorns will see get picked up by various NFL teams in the weeks that follow the draft itself.

However, Charles Omenihu is the most likely player among all the former Longhorns in this draft class to go either on day one or early in day two. In all likelihood, Charles Omenihu will go in day two in the 2019 NFL Draft. But, there is still a chance that a team reaches for him late in the first round despite this loaded draft along the defensive line.

The first round of this draft will mainly highlight defensive linemen. Since this isn’t the strongest quarterback and running back class we’ve ever seen, so a lot of the attention will fall to prospects on the defensive side of the ball in general.

This class is fairly potent and deep at linebacker, but the secondary is lacking in depth too. Yet, Charles Omenihu is a name to watch to likely creep into the second or third round. The final seven-round 2019 NFL Mock Draft from CBS Sports before day one itself had Charles Omenihu falling at No. 55 to the Miami Dolphins.

Any team that needs a lengthy and strong pass rusher that fits very well into a 3-4 scheme scheme in the NFL needs to take a look at Omenihu. The reigning Big 12 Defensive Lineman of the Year has the potential to come in and make an impact right away. He could even win a starting role during his rookie campaign.

Few defensive ends will come in with the maturity level of the former Longhorn Omenihu. He has multiple years of starting experience under two head coaches on the Forty Acres. He was a recruit of former Texas head coach Charlie Strong and finished his collegiate career under Tom Herman. He’s certainly a big player to watch starting on April 25 in this 2019 NFL Draft.

Kahale Warring Jersey

The Texans spent the 2019 NFL Draft selecting interesting developmental players. Tytus Howard is a mysterious exoplanet who exists in the shadows of the solar system. Max Scharping has to learn how to use his hands correctly and fix his pass set to stop turning and shielding. Lonnie Johnson Jr. is strength and length, but doesn’t know how to use it, and needs to figure how how to overwhelm receivers at the line of scrimmage and play the ball in the air. In the third round the Texans didn’t find a weekend project, a post divorce All-American red muscle car, a picnic table that will never be sealed and painted, orange ceilings are going to remain popcorned forever. Kahale Warring will walk in, and play right now, right away.

In the Mountain West Conference Warring was an overwhelming athlete. This is important. When watching players from smaller conferences, they have to jump off the screen, and appear different than their peers. Warring is this. Unlike some tight ends that groan and ache off the line of scrimmage, Warring was a sling shot as he sprinted past the second level of the defense. He jumps off the line from a two point stance, finds a hole in the zone, and comes back to the quarterback. Six yards on second and ten from a tight end is refreshing.

Warring scorched linebackers who were stuck trying to cover him. He could run around their jam, unfazed, thanks to a ridiculous size, strength, and speed combination. At the top of his route he’d lose linebackers once he made his break. He exemplifies the old adage that depicts the importance of tight ends. He’s too fast for linebackers, and too strong for defensive backs. Off the play action he teleports around an inept jab and snags the corner route.

Play action off the jet sweep, hmmmm, looks like something the Houston Texans would run. Warring is lined up on the right side of the line of scrimmage in a two point stance against the sweatpantsuit linebacker in man coverage. This is a perfect wheel route. Warring gets wide to create space then utilizes his speed to separate from the linebacker. When he turns and runs he loses the linebacker. There’s nothing worse than a pass catcher who can’t catch and routinely allows the ball to come into his chest. Warring yanks up, high points the ball in a crowd of three, makes the catch, and backs his way into the endzone.